Inkheart - Cornelia Funke, Anthea Bell

This is my book for Guy Fawkes Night.  

Book themes for Guy Fawkes Night: Any book about the English monarchy (any genre), political treason, political thrillers, or where fire is a major theme, or fire is on the cover.

 

I finally finished this book.  It´s been cold and snowy here and that has caused my pain to flare up: both my Fibromyalgia and PsA pain stacked on top of each other.  I have had a hard time focusing enough to read.  I finally listened to the unabridged audio book instead.  It was very good but I always wish they read faster.  It was okay this time though because my brain was running snow anyway.  I could only focus for small periods also so it still took me a long time to get through.  

 

It was narrated by Lynn Redgrave who made me want to make some English Breakfast tea and scones with clotted cream and jam.  

 

The story was very imaginative.  Reading about Meggie made me think of my oldest son.  He loved books from a very young age.  I would often peak into my son's room at night when he was supposed to be sleeping to see the glow of a flashlight under a tent of blankets.  One time when my son´s teachers told me he wasn't turning in his work at school and he was failing his classes we had to do something drastic to get his attention.  The only thing he cared about was his books so I bought a lockable garage cabinet and put his books in it and padlocked it.  I told him I would unlock it only when his teacher told me he was doing better in school.  That was the hardest thing to do but he did finally decide to do his work.

 

This story is about Meggie and her father who live in an old farm house.  Meggie's father mends books, chasing away the mold and book worms and giving them new dresses.  Meggie didn't remember her mother who had gone away nine years before.  One day Meggie looked out her window and saw a strange man standing out in the pouring rain.  He was just standing there staring at their house.  She went to tell her father and he brought the stranger in.  Only, her father seemed to know him.  He called him Dustfinger and Dustfinger called her father Silvertongue.  Meggie was sent to her room to go to bed but she sneaked back and listened outside the door to them talk in hushed voices about a horrible man called Capricorn.  The way they talked scared Meggie and she begged her father to send him away.  She didn't like him.  

 

The next morning Meggie's father woke her up early and was packing for a trip.  They set off on a trip that Meggie would never forget, to a place where things come out of books and are not always good.  Meggie learned that it is a lot more fun to read about the adventures in books than to be in them herself.  

 

My son that I mentioned above wanted me to read this book.  He knew I would like it.